Thursday, October 6, 2011

dirty laundry...

there is no way around it. when you are a potter, everything gets covered in clay, including your clothes. we all know that clay in your plumbing is not a good thing. this is one thing i do to prevent that...

this is my pre-wash station behind the studio! i spray the clay off with the hose, let them almost drip dry, then throw the clothes in the washer. i do this with our aprons and shop towels as well. i used to soak towels etc. in a large bucket of water and ring them out, prior to washing. i found that the wringing out and handling the heavy wet stuff was hard on my shoulder, so some time ago i decided on this method.
if our clothes aren't too clay encrusted i will just scrape off any globs before washing and skip this rinsing off step. my washer also has an extra rinse cycle that really helps.
i am curious to hear what other methods readers use to keep their washing machines and plumbing clay free.
illness update: still coughing and blowing my nose, but feeling and sleeping much better... thank you for all your get well soon wishes... despite being under the weather, all my pots are glazed and we are ready to load the ground hog kiln tomorrow. i think the sunshine helped my recovery. i did a lot of the glazing outside and absorbed some good vitamin C & D via the sunshine!

7 comments:

  1. One good thing about my handbuilding I don't get much clay on anything. My towels are prerinse. Try that wellness formula, it actually works better if the minute you think you are feeling under the weather you take two caplets, it helps prevent you from getting the full blown stuff.

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  2. I don't know why, but I hardly get any clay on my clothes each day. When I was in college we did not have drip trays on the wheels, and pottery students always had a huge a glamorous crust of clay all over their legs!

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  3. we tend to use aprons and towels and keep our hands off our clothes if possible.
    I killed a washing machine from clay many years back- so we do much the same with aprons and towels- and they get hung out- never go in my washing machine- Mark does the hard part of wringing them out.

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  4. II've been using the water bucket which is a drag; I like the idea of your method. Might be a problem in winter though! A friend got hold of a machine meant for washing horse blankets at a farm auction. That's the best!

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  5. my clothes stay fairly clean... when Jeff is in production mode he gets really covered in clay (note that it is his pants hanging out there!).
    i bought a new washer two years ago and i don't want to kill it.
    in NH i stopped washing towels & aprons in the winter because of the cold... then i had lots of back breaking work to do come spring. at least here in NC the winter is short.

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  6. When it gets cold out and I don't want to deal with buckets of water in the yard, I throw my clay clothes and towels into a basket. Every two or three weeks I go to the laundramat and throw them into a large front loader. I dry them at home.

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